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How to Tackle Pregnancy High Blood Pressure

Pregnancy high blood pressure in and of itself doesnít necessarily mean harm for you or your baby. However, it can put you at higher risk for developing a dangerous condition known as eclampsia. For a healthy pregnancy, itís best to avoid high blood pressure altogether.

Eclampsia is a pregnancy condition that can cause your brain, eyes and liver to begin shutting down as an indirect result of the pregnancy and as a direct result of pregnancy high blood pressure. In advanced stages of the condition, the mother can enter a coma. In addition, the condition can also cause the placenta to separate from the uterine wall, requiring premature delivery of the baby and leading to anemia in the mother due to heavy bleeding. Generally, this condition occurs later in pregnancy, usually during the third trimester.

Pregnancy high blood pressure is one symptom that can indicate pre-eclampsia. Other symptoms may include swelling in the hands and face. If swelling isnít present, protein in the urine can also indicate pre-eclampsia.

Women who have high blood pressure before they get pregnant have a higher risk of pregnancy high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia. Women who have diabetes or kidney problems may also be at a higher risk for the condition. Age can also impact these risk factors, and women over forty are at the highest risk for pregnancy high blood pressure.

The threat of eclampsia is one of the reasons that prenatal care is so important. Pregnancy high blood pressure can be detected and treated early on before pre-eclampsia sets in. However, you must be consistent in your trips to your doctor and report any problems with the dizziness and weakness that can be associated with high blood pressure.

The only way that you can stop eclampsia from occurring is to deliver the baby. If you donít have pregnancy high blood pressure until the third trimester, youíll probably be able to deliver your baby without complications. However, the further into your third trimester you are before you deliver, the better chances your baby has for being born healthy. Remember that if youíre faced with the decision, your own life isnít worth keeping your baby within the womb any longer than necessary with eclampsia threatening.

Of course, the best way to avoid eclampsia is to avoid pregnancy high blood pressure altogether. If youíre at a high risk for eclampsia, do your best to keep your sodium levels down before and during pregnancy. This will help lower blood pressure. You should also get regular exercise and take in plenty of fiber and whole grains in your diet.

Besides diet and exercise, a large part of what controls blood pressure is lifestyle. If you can quit smoking before your pregnancy, youíll severely lower your risk for pregnancy high blood pressure. Also, keep alcohol consumption to a minimum before pregnancy and cut it out entirely during pregnancy. You should also do your best to maintain a lifestyle thatís as free from emotional and physical stress as is possible during pregnancy.

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